Occasional Guest Bedroom Designs – Tips and Ideas

How To Design Your Own Bedroom

You may think that well thought out bedroom designs can be skipped when it comes to the guest or spare bedroom, but if people are going to be using it (your guests for example) it’s certainly worth putting a little thought and effort into it.

A world-famous hotelier is reputed to commission the decoration of his hotel bedrooms only after the interior designer has produced a mock-up of the proposed scheme and after he, the hotel group president, has slept in the sample room for 2 nights. These are extreme measures for a host to take to ensure the comfort of his guests, but should we do anything less for the enjoyment of our personal visitors?

Multi Use Bedroom Designs

Few households these days can afford to dedicate bedroom space for the exclusive use of a sporadic guest. Space in many houses will simply not permit it and, more often than not, this room will have to double up with some other function. A study or dressing room could probably most easily be converted to serve this additional purpose with the minimum of disruption, or perhaps a little-used dining room might be considered.

Whichever space is selected, take care not to compromise the room’s main purpose to any degree for the sake of the occasional visitor. With clever planning it should be possible to devise a room to take on both roles without difficulty.

Should you ever wish to issue an impromptu invitation for an overnight stay, it is important that the room can be readied quickly – no guests like to think that they are putting a host/hostess to any trouble. The conversion therefore needs to be achieved without major furniture movements or storage adjustments.

Bedroom Interior Design Ideas

Beds, when not in use, can be disguised in a variety of ways:

  • Convertible chair- and sofa-beds are sold in their thousands and are extremely popular, but be aware that some seating comfort may be compromised by the bed mechanism.
  • The fold-away type which emerges, ready-made, from a wall cupboard is easy to erect and is unobtrusive when not in use.
  • A fold-up camp bed is cheap and useful for visiting children, but may not offer sufficient comfort for an adult. There is also the problem of housing the bed when it is not in use.
  • A day bed is for many the most satisfactory solution. When dressed with bolsters during the day, it provides useful seating and can be handsomely draped for decorative impact. Bedding may be contained within drawers beneath the divan or in a separate blanket box or chest.
  • If your need is to provide for two guests, one of the best solutions is a bed with collapsible legs which slips beneath a second bed when not required.

Lighting in this dual-purpose room needs to be carefully thought through if it is to serve both uses adequately. Incorporating free-standing lights such as table lamps and standard lamps will allow you to make swift minor adjustments to your arrangement. Always ensure that there is some form of lighting which can be switched from the bedside.

A wash basin in a guest room is a boon, giving independence to the guest and relieving pressure on a family bathroom. A nearby radiator could have a temporary rack attached for holding towels and a folding screen might be employed to hide the basin when it’s not in use.

If the dual role of the room is to be disguised, good storage will be needed. A desk in a study might house stationery, and when the room is required as a bedroom, this could be covered with a full length cloth and a mirror placed on top for use as a dressing table.

Where there is no room for a wardrobe, a coat stand or hooks on the back of a door should suffice for the short stayer. Somewhere will be needed to set down a suitcase. A folding luggage rack, painted to co-ordinate with your scheme and crossed with pretty braid, is an ideal solution.

Garden Decoration From Junk by Leeann MacKenzie

In recent years, flea markets, junk yards, garage and yard sales, basements and attics have all been recognized as treasure chests. These places are home to antiques, memorabilia and junk. For the people who have a vision of resurrecting cast-offs found in these places, The book Garden Decoration From Junk is one to read before setting out on your quest. The book will certainly brings new meaning to container gardening and garden accessories!

A little imagination, along with the unique suggestions from the pages of this book and your yard will have a character like no other. The operative word here is imagination and after reading this book, you will chastise yourself for throwing out some perfectly good garden accessories. Everything from tin cans to car springs and cutlery can be incorporated into your outdoor setting. Your deck, patio and yard can have unique pieces that will not be found at the local garden and yard decorating centers.

Visualize old garden tools as a support for clematis, scarlet runner beans or sweet peas. Metal containers such as pots, buckets and tin cans housing your herbs. Books and foot wear that have been damaged beyond repair or restoration once again come alive and will become the center of conversation when used as planters.

This book provides an abundance of pictures that will give you every opportunity to invent an end product that would add personality to your decor both inside and out.

The old adage that one man’s junk is another man’s treasure is confirmed in page after page in this intriguing book by Leeann MacKenzie.

Planters Accent Your Home and Garden

The right planter in the right setting brings style, function and beauty to any indoor room or outdoor location. Planters can be used as a unique focal point or a graceful accent in any garden, patio, porch or room. The secret is finding the perfect planter – one that reflects the owner’s personality and surroundings while maintaining lasting durability. 

Planters come in a large variety of shapes, sizes, designs, materials and price points, which makes some planters a better choice than others. In today’s market, the unlimited assortment can also create unlimited indecision. Knowing a few useful tips can simplify the decision-making process and help consumers purchase plantersthat will bring years of pleasure. 

Considerations Before Purchasing A Planter   

o Location (shade, sun, extreme weather)                                                                                        

o Maneuverability                                                                                                             

o Size, Shape, Style, Color, Finish, Texture                                                            

o Drainage Hole and/or Self-Watering Options                                                                     

o Durability & Longevity                                                                                                     

o Artistic/Decorative Impact                                                                                               

o Reflect Personality of Owner/Home/Surroundings                                                                                                  

o Materials (Learn the advantages and disadvantages of planter materials such as clay, terracotta, concrete, metal, wood, resin, fiberglass, etc.)                                                                                                                

o Storage Concerns

A great way to get started is to purchase a matching set of various sized planters ranging from three, five or seven in total. Five containers used in a corner of a patio will help define your entertainment space. This grouped planter display can provide privacy and help tie in your overall outdoor living area. Don’t be afraid of using bright and vivid containers such as oranges, iridescent blues and reds. These colors can help liven up outdoor spaces.

Combining plants is a fun part of container gardening. Try mixing and matching different plants such as annuals, tropicals, perennials, trees, shrubs, vines and vegetables. Before planting, arrange the new plants in or around your container while they are still in their small pots to see how they fit best. A good rule of thumb is to plant the tallest upright foliage plant in the center. Next, plant the shorter and more compact flowering plant to the side of the center, near the edge of the planter. Leave enough space between these plants to allow for growth. Finally, place plants with trailing or semi-trailing growth habits around the planters’ outer edges leaving enough space for adequate spreading and trailing.

A word of caution: Also remove new plants from their nursery pots with care. Never remove them by pulling on their tender stems. Gently loosen or untangle the bottom inch of each plant’s roots before carefully spreading them out in your planter. This helps give young plants a better start. Additional potting mix can be added to ensure the soil covers the roots of each plant. When your planting is finished, the soil should be at least an inch below the rim of the container.

Gardening with planters is a great way for beginning and experienced gardeners to dig into the botanical world. And best of all, you can take your planter garden with you when you move.